Alchemist Siberian Cats

Alchemist Siberian Cats


About Siberians

Personality

Siberian cats are real fun-loving felines.

Jack playing hide and seek
Jack playing hide and seek

They are energetic and always ready to play a game with you, but never let you win! They are particularly fascinated by water and often you’ll find them enthralled by a dripping tap or nonchalantly strolling in soaking wet after they fell in the fish pond!

Being intelligent and, like most felines, incredibly inquisitive they like to get involved in all aspects of the household – helping dig holes in the garden, sitting on the newspaper you’re trying to read or just fooling around with the bubbles in the washing up bowl – they’re always around to lend a paw and make you laugh.

This breed is often described as having many ‘dog-like’ traits (just never let your cat catch you saying it!) so can be a good alternative for those couples where one is a ‘cat person’ and the other is a ‘dog person’. They are extremely loyal to their owners; a real best friend who’s there greet you when you get home, play with you when you’re happy and hug you when you’re down. Quick to learn they can easily be taught to walk on a lead (this is great for those who don’t have a secure outdoor space) and some of them even like to play fetch!

Ash loved this mouse so much he carried it about with him all day!
Ash loved this mouse so much he carried it about with him all day!

Despite having huge reserves of energy, Siberians are really quite caring, gentle souls who never have a bad word to say about anyone. Personally I think that the combination of playfulness and patience makes them the ideal choice for families with young children. We have also found that they mix well with other animals, including dogs.

Jack hugs his little sister Holly
Jack hugs his little sister Holly

Siberian cats have a sweet chirruping voice and an impressive purr.

Siberians are happy being kept as either indoor or outdoor cats, but indoor only cats will need lots of toys and stimulation to keep them happy. Providing access to a secure garden or outside cat pen can be a great compromise; you’re sure of their safety and they have the chance to feel the wind in their whiskers as they watch the world go by.

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Type

The Siberian is a medium to large cat that can take anything up to 5 years to reach full maturity. It’s substantial bone structure, broad chest and big paws give a general appearance of substance and strength – defiantly a cat with ‘heft’.

Often likened to the Maine Coon and the Norwegian Forest Cat; the Siberian Cat is easily distinguished by its more ‘cobby’ body shape and it's broad, wedge shaped head, giving an overall impression of circles and rounded contours.

Our foundation queen shows off her excellent type
Our foundation queen shows off her excellent type


The Siberian Cat is classed as semi-longhaired and has a distinctive coat that changes with the seasons and is unique to the breed. The topcoat consists of a layer of long waterproof guard hairs beneath which is very dense, soft undercoat. The coat is considerably longer and thicker in winter; complete with a full ruff, fluffy breeches and a big bushy tail to tackle those cold Siberian winds!

Other examples of this cat’s wild heritage can be seen in their tufted paw pads and the lynx tips on their ears.

One of the reasons I love this breed is that there is a huge variety of colours and patterns; all with and without white. Some say that truly traditional Siberian Cats have tabby markings, but tortoiseshells, solids and colour points (now known as Neva Masquerades) are all recognised.

Rosy has beautifully expressive eyes
Rosy has beautifully expressive eyes

A Siberian Cat’s bright eyes greatly contribute to its alert, intelligent expression; they are large, slightly oval in shape but with a rounded lower line, set wide apart and slightly oblique. Eye colour ranges from coppers to greens, with blue being permitted only in the Neva Masquerade varieties.

The Standard of Point varies slightly between the different registration bodies. We show our cats with the GCCF and so breed to those standards.

Above all we try to breed cats whose overall appearance reflects the Siberian’s natural heritage - a wildcat of Russia.

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Hypo-Allergenic

It has been found that some people who normally suffer from cat allergies are able to live happily with a Siberian Cat.

Kevin & family - another successful allergy home.
Kevin & family - another successful allergy home.

Allergies are cause by the FelD1 allergen, transferred from a cat’s saliva onto the coat when they wash themselves, flakes of which then become airborne causing irritation. Research has shown that the Siberian Cats fur contains less FelD1 than other breeds.

However, as everyone responds differently, if you suffer from allergies it is very important that you have an allergy test. This involves visiting a breeder and sitting with their cats for an hour or two, this also gives you a chance to learn more about the breed and meet some of their cats and kittens.

If you would like to arrange an allergy test please contact us to arrange a suitable date.

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Health

Originating from the natural process of evolution, where only the fittest survive, Siberian cats are strong and robust. There are few known health problems associated with the breed however two genetic diseases have been identified.

Poppy and her granddaughter Cinnamon.
Poppy and her granddaughter Cinnamon.

The first is Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) and the second is Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). A DNA test can confirm if a cat carries the gene responsible for PKD and both Holly and Poppy are tested negative. There is no genetic test for HMC in Siberians yet but it has not manifested in any of our girls ancestors, descendants or relations.

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Breed History

Although a very ancient breed (with written records dating back to 13th century), pet cats were banned under the Russian communist regime and so the Siberian Cat has only become a pedigree breed relatively recently.

Siberians could be found living wild in the streets and hanging around the markets as well as in the countryside and the forests of Siberia. After the fall of communism in Russia, these feral cats were taken in and domesticated by the local population. Recognising their wild magnificence people began to take the cats to shows and the Siberian Breed was established as the Aboriginal Cat of Russia.

Mars is one of the foundation siberian cats
Mars is one of the foundation siberian cats

The first breed standard was developed in 1987 based on the stud ‘Roman’ who was one of the foundation cats and appears in many current pedigrees.

Exportation to Europe and the USA began in the 1990’s, but it was not until 2002 that the first Siberian’s put their paws on British soil.

Since then the number of breeders in the UK has increased very quickly as word spreads about this wonderful breed. We consider ourselves to be really lucky to be able to witness and contribute to the foundation of a new breed in Britain.

The Siberian Breed is accepted by both TICA and FIFe and is currently working towards championship status with the GCCF.

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